As websites provide both static and dynamic content, some aspects of the user interface attract attention more than others do.

Users don’t read, they scan. Analyzing a web-page, users search for some fixed points or anchors which would guide them through the content of the page.

Web users are impatient and insist on instant gratification. Very simple principle: If a website isn’t able to meet users’ expectations, then designer failed to get his job done properly and the company loses money. The higher is the cognitive load and the less intuitive is the navigation, the more willing are users to leave the website and search for alternatives. [JN / DWU]

Users don’t make optimal choices. Users don’t search for the quickest way to find the information they’re looking for. Neither do they scan webpage in a linear fashion, going sequentially from one site section to another one. Instead users satisfice;

They choose the first reasonable option. As soon as they find a link that seems like it might lead to the goal, there is a very good chance that it will be immediately clicked. Optimizing is hard, and it takes a long time. Satisficing is more efficient.

Don’t Make Users Think #

According to Krug’s first law of usability, the web-page should be obvious and self-explanatory. When you’re creating a site, your job is to get rid of the question marks — the decisions users need to make consciously, considering pros, cons and alternatives.

If the navigation and site architecture aren’t intuitive, the number of question marks grows and makes it harder for users to comprehend how the system works and how to get from point A to point B.

A clear structure, moderate visual clues and easily recognizable links can help users to find their path to their aim.

Don’t Squander Users’ Patience #

In every project when you are going to offer your visitors some service or tool, try to keep your user requirements minimal.

The less action is required from users to test a service, the more likely a random visitor is to actually try it out. First-time visitors are willing to play with the service, not filling long web forms for an account they might never use in the future.

Let users explore the site and discover your services without forcing them into sharing private data. It’s not reasonable to force users to enter an email address to test the feature.

As Ryan Singer — the developer of the 37Signals team — states, users would probably be eager to provide an email address if they were asked for it after they’d seen the feature work, so they had some idea of what they were going to get in return.

Ideally remove all barriers, don’t require subscriptions or registrations first. A user registration alone is enough of an impediment to user navigation to cut down on incoming traffic.

3. Manage To Focus Users’ Attention #

As websites provide both static and dynamic content, some aspects of the user interface attract attention more than others do.

Obviously, images are more eye-catching than the text — just as the sentences marked as bold are more attractive than plain text.

The human eye is a highly non-linear device, and web-users can instantly recognize edges, patterns and motions. This is why video-based advertisements are extremely annoying and distracting, but from the marketing perspective they perfectly do the job of capturing users’ attention.


The site has 9 main navigation options which are visible at the first glance. The choice of colors might be too light, though.

Letting the user see clearly what functions are available is a fundamental principle of successful user interface design.

It doesn’t really matter how this is achieved. What matters is that the content is well-understood and visitors feel comfortable with the way they interact with the system.

5. Make Use Of Effective Writing #

As the Web is different from print, it’s necessary to adjust the writing style to users’ preferences and browsing habits. Promotional writing won’t be read. Long text blocks without images and keywords marked in bold or italics will be skipped. Exaggerated language will be ignored.

Talk business. Avoid cute or clever names, marketing-induced names, company-specific names, and unfamiliar technical names. For instance, if you describe a service and want users to create an account, “sign up” is better than “start now!” which is again better than “explore our services”.

Strive For Simplicity #

The “keep it simple”-principle (KIS) should be the primary goal of site design. Users are rarely on a site to enjoy the design; furthermore, in most cases they are looking for the information despite the design. Strive for simplicity instead of complexity.

From the visitors’ point of view, the best site design is a pure text, without any advertisements or further content blocks matching exactly the query visitors used or the content they’ve been looking for.

This is one of the reasons why a user-friendly print-version of web pages is essential for good user experience.

Don’t Be Afraid Of The White Space #

Actually it’s really hard to overestimate the importance of white space. Not only does it help to reduce the cognitive load for the visitors, but it makes it possible to perceive the information presented on the screen.

When a new visitor approaches a design layout, the first thing he/she tries to do is to scan the page and divide the content area into digestible pieces of information.

Complex structures are harder to read, scan, analyze and work with. If you have the choice between separating two design segments by a visible line or by some whitespace.

It’s usually better to use the whitespace solution. Hierarchical structures reduce complexity (Simon’s Law): the better you manage to provide users with a sense of visual hierarchy, the easier your content will be to perceive.

Communicate Effectively With A “Visible Language” #

In his papers on effective visual communication, Aaron Marcus states three fundamental principles involved in the use of the so-called “visible language” — the content users see on a screen.

Organize: provide the user with a clear and consistent conceptual structure. Consistency, screen layout, relationships and navigability are important concepts of organization. The same conventions and rules should be applied to all elements.
Economize: do the most with the least amount of cues and visual elements. Four major points to be considered: simplicity, clarity, distinctiveness, and emphasis. Simplicity includes only the elements that are most important for communication. Clarity: all components should be designed so their meaning is not ambiguous. Distinctiveness: the important properties of the necessary elements should be distinguishable. Emphasis: the most important elements should be easily perceived.
Communicate: match the presentation to the capabilities of the user. The user interface must keep in balance legibility, readability, typography, symbolism, multiple views, and color or texture in order to communicate successfully. Use max. 3 typefaces in a maximum of 3 point sizes — a maximum of 18 words or 50-80 characters per line of text.

9. Conventions Are Our Friends #

Conventional design of site elements doesn’t result in a boring web site. In fact, conventions are very useful as they reduce the learning curve, the need to figure out how things work. For instance, it would be a usability nightmare if all websites had different visual presentation of RSS-feeds. That’s not that different from our regular life where we tend to get used to basic principles of how we organize data (folders) or do shopping (placement of products).

With conventions you can gain users’ confidence, trust, reliability and prove your credibility. Follow users’ expectations — understand what they’re expecting from a site navigation, text structure, search placement etc.

A typical example from usability sessions is to translate the page in Japanese (assuming your web users don’t know Japanese, e.g. with Babelfish) and provide your usability testers with a task to find something in the page of different language. If conventions are well-applied, users will be able to achieve a not-too-specific objective, even if they can’t understand a word of it.

Steve Krug suggests that it’s better to innovate only when you know you really have a better idea, but take advantages of conventions when you don’t.

10. Test Early, Test Often #

This so-called TETO-principle should be applied to every web design project as usability tests often provide crucial insights into significant problems and issues related to a given layout.


).

Some important points to keep in mind:

according to Steve Krug, testing one user is 100% better than testing none and testing one user early in the project is better than testing 50 near the end. Accoring to Boehm’s first law, errors are most frequent during requirements and design activities and are the more expensive the later they are removed.

testing is an iterative process. That means that you design something, test it, fix it and then test it again. There might be problems which haven’t been found during the first round as users were practically blocked by other problems.
usability tests always produce useful results. Either you’ll be pointed to the problems you have or you’ll be pointed to the absence of major design flaws which is in both cases a useful insight for your project.
according to Weinberg’s law, a developer is unsuited to test his or her code.

This holds for designers as well. After you’ve worked on a site for few weeks, you can’t observe it from a fresh perspective anymore.

You know how it is built and therefore you know exactly how it works — you have the wisdom independent testers and visitors of your site wouldn’t have.

The first step in winning over more customers is to understand the essential elements that should go into every homepage.

Once you’ve mastered the basics, draw inspiration from 31 top homepage designs so you can find out what will work best for your business and your audience.

The Benefits of a Well-Designed Homepage

A simple homepage design welcomes your audience to your site, tells them what you want them to do next, and allows them to explore your site in more depth.

You can add complexity to a simple homepage design, but you don’t want to start with a cluttered mess and have to selectively prune it. Always begin with the basics.

What do you need on your homepage? What will your audience expect? And which elements take priority?

When you can answer those questions, you’ll have the information you need for better homepage design. In web design, homepage elements have very specific purposes.
Helping your target audience get to know your business

Many of your website visitors will find your homepage first. With that in mind, you need to make a solid first impression.

Your homepage should provide a sense of your company’s values, unique selling proposition (USP), and purpose. You’re more likely to lure in potential customers if you can effectively communicate this information.
Improving the user experience on your website

Consumers visit your website with a purpose. It could be to check out your product line, read your blog posts, or find out if you sell a particular type of service.

Regardless, you want to direct that consumer to the appropriate page. Your homepage design should facilitate this transition by providing intuitive navigation and a sense of how your website flows.
Accruing more conversions

You want website visitors to convert, but they won’t if you don’t give them the necessary incentive and opportunity. Maybe you want to build an email list, but if visitors can’t find a signup form, your database will remain empty.

By making this information easily accessible on your homepage, you will see an uptick in conversions.

Another way to boost conversions is to create a strong first impression with your homepage. If visitors enjoy their experience on your website, they’ll also be more likely to remember it in the future. Maybe you won’t make a sale today, but that customer will return days or weeks later and buy from you.
Improving brand awareness

Make your company memorable by allowing your brand image and messaging to come through on every page. This is especially true when it comes to your homepage design because the homepage serves as the gateway to the rest of your website.

Your logo, tagline, and purpose need to take center stage. In fact, you might even want to add a form or statement to the very top of your homepage — preferably in a large font — that gives your visitors a sense of what you do:

What problems do you solve for your customers? How do you improve your clients’ lives — whether personal or professional?

Don’t force your website audience to have to figure out and guess what it is you do. Make it clear from the get go.
How to Design a Website Homepage

Now that you know the four goals to motivate your design principles, ask yourself three guiding questions: What do you absolutely need on your homepage? Who is your target audience and what will they expect? Which elements take priority?

Once you have the answers to these three questions, you can begin plotting out how best to improve your homepage.

Remember to tie each of your design elements to one of the four goals listed above. Most importantly, don’t worry about getting it perfect. Website optimization is an ongoing process!


Web design Vietnam Do not focus too much on the interface when designing:
Aesthetics is a factor to evaluate a professional website, but it is not the most important issue because the view of beauty is different one person and no website can satisfy all. everyone. The most important thing is that you need to know the target customers come to your website, information, products, images, presentation ...
So a website needs to achieve both scientific and aesthetic elements. The aesthetic element of the interface is well appreciated if the colors are not too showy, the effects are not confusing influenced the market value and the viewer's eyes.


Website design services A strong website design can set the first impression for, As you look into redesigning your website, you may wonder the importance to website design. How does it impact your audience and your business? Let’s look at five



Web Design-Only Companies

Unfortunately, bargain-basement rates are the kryptonite of many people who want websites but have little to no knowledge of how things work in the world of web design.

The moment they see that a web design company is offering very low rates compared to the competition, they jump at the chance.

The problem with cheap web design rates is that you will most likely pay for barebones web design. If you want specific features and functions added, you may have to shell out more for them. You will, in all likelihood, spend more money on your website in the end.

To get an idea about fair professional web design rates these days, do some research of your own. You can also ask friends and family for recommendations.

Full Payment Upfront

Would you trust a web design service provider that requires you to pay for your website in full before they do any work on it?

Legitimate web design companies ask for a deposit. The client and the company will then agree on a payment plan that will run until the website is up and working. Steer clear of any web design company that demands payment in advance.

Too Much Tech Mumbo-Jumbo

I’ve found that many of my clients don’t know a lot about designing websites, which is why they’re looking for a professional web designer in the first place.

Some web design companies, however, tend to use a lot of tech-speak when pitching their plans for the project to the client.

More often than not, clients end up agreeing to things they barely understand, but they have to pay for them anyway because the web designer said so.

But what if the tech-speak was just a way for clients to spend money on bells and whistles that they don’t really need?

If you know little about web design and a prospective web design company sounds like it’s dazzling you with lots of tech mumbo-jumbo, give that company a hard pass and look for another one that will speak to you in plain, simple English.

There was a time when getting a website built meant hiring a web designer for its aesthetics and a separate web developer to make sure it functioned well.

That is no longer the case these days, as a web design company is now expected to offer both web design and web development. Don’t hire a web design company that only offers to make websites look good and nothing else.

CMS Not Included

Every website that you pay a web design company to build should have a built-in CMS or content management system. Consider yourself tricked if the website you got from a web designer doesn’t have one.

A CMS-less website means editing its content is going to a problem that can only be solved if you reach out to your web design company and get them to edit it for a fee.

Steer clear of web design companies that do not incorporate CMS platforms such as WordPress and SharePoint, or Magento in the case of e-commerce sites.

Nonresponsive Design

The world is a very mobile place, with smartphone and tablet users far outnumbering desktop users. You want your website to display well across all screens, so don’t leave your web design in the hands of a company that doesn’t do responsive web design.

If you see any or all of these signs in a prospective web design company, run the other way, and find ones that offer the exact opposite.

Do you know that 70 to 90% of your site visitors may leave your website within 3 to 4 seconds without showing interest in your product or services, and you lose all these potential opportunities? Is your existing web design company able to understand this

Your Website is not appealing enough when compared to your nearest competitors.
Your website's overall design, graphics, and navigation are not modern.
The webpage content copy is not user-centric and engaging.
The website is not mobile responsive and has a weak performance.
The website fails to build trust and connect to your Brand.

Fully Responsive Sites

With the average consumer spending roughly 20% of their day in front of their phone.




Affordable Website Design Services

Regardless of the size of your business, the opportunity to gain greater exposure within your consumer market sector is ever present.

It is important to consider whether or not your existing business website design is significantly hindering or helping your online marketing position.

With professional web design services, you can get an attractive website that is highly functional and optimized.

At Siren Digital Marketing, we offer exceptional, affordable web design services to significantly elevate your brand image and visibility online.

If you need small business web design services, or a more advanced website for your enterprise business, we have you covered.

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